©

hautekills:

Fabrics from Christian Dior haute couture s/s 2014






theficklefox:

biblesandtea:

northmagneticpole:

Jesse Cornelius

can’t wait for summer days like these

Hey! That’s my amigos and I in Havasu!

theficklefox:

biblesandtea:

northmagneticpole:

Jesse Cornelius

can’t wait for summer days like these

Hey! That’s my amigos and I in Havasu!






hellofromtumblr:

Love something? Reblog it!
Ever see something on Tumblr and wish it was on your blog? Well, it can be. Just hit the reblog button on the post, add some stuff if you’d like, and voila! Touch it and make it yours.
Find something too reblog

I think this post hypnotized me to reblog it.

hellofromtumblr:

Love something? Reblog it!

Ever see something on Tumblr and wish it was on your blog? Well, it can be. Just hit the reblog button on the post, add some stuff if you’d like, and voila! Touch it and make it yours.

Find something too reblog

I think this post hypnotized me to reblog it.




There are darknesses in life and there are lights, and you are one of the lights, the light of all lights.

Bram Stoker, “Dracula (via petrichour)






vaginalistic:

attempting to hide your desperate need for breath after a short flight of stairs






malt-tango:

cyborgorgy:

This robot costs as much as an iphone 5, believe it or not

"That doesn’t seem right"






theatlantic:

Survival Tweets

When Sandra Hassan created the I Am Alive app, her intention was mostly dark humor. A 26-year-old graduate student in Paris, Hassan had gotten sick of worrying about family and friends whenever she heard news of a suicide bombing in her hometown of Beirut. A detonation on January 21, in the same neighborhood where a car bomb had exploded just three weeks earlier, spurred her to action. In what she describes as an “expression of discontent,” Hassan developed an app that allows users, with one touch, to tweet a reassuring message to their followers: “I am still alive! #Lebanon #LatestBombing.”

The app quickly caught on: within a month, it was downloaded more than 5,000 times.

Read more.






julianaar:

beautiful-wildlife:

After the bath by Kyriakos Kaziras
Lioness with her ​​cub after crossing a river

🐾

julianaar:

beautiful-wildlife:

After the bath by Kyriakos Kaziras

Lioness with her ​​cub after crossing a river

🐾










vicemag:

There’s a Bootleg Jurassic Park-Themed Restaurant in Los Angeles
Weirdness is getting harder to find these days.
Between marketers, sitcom characters, and whacky dickheads in shirts that say things about ninjas and bacon, genuinly odd stuff is difficult to come by. So I was extremely excited to hear about Jurassic Restaurant, a (presumably) unofficial Jurassic Park-themed Taiwanese restaurant in Industry, California. 

Weird shit used to be everywhere. If Tod Browning’s Freaks is to be believed, it used to be that you could barely open your door without tripping over some undiscovered weirdo. 
But then lunacy got gentrified and oddness became mainstream—co-opted by Phoebe from Friends and printed on trucker caps to be sold at Hot Topic (over 600 locations nationwide).
American entertainment became about gawking at weirdos. TV shows about women who eat couches or get plastic surgery to look like celebrities became the norm. The guy with a 300-pound scrotum (RIP) got an agent. 

Marketers and advertisers got their claws in, too. Weirdness used to be a pursuit for outsiders, but now it’s thought up by teams of market researchers, to be regurgitated by the Old Spice Guy or the Geico Gecko. 
Continue

vicemag:

There’s a Bootleg Jurassic Park-Themed Restaurant in Los Angeles

Weirdness is getting harder to find these days.

Between marketers, sitcom characters, and whacky dickheads in shirts that say things about ninjas and bacon, genuinly odd stuff is difficult to come by. So I was extremely excited to hear about Jurassic Restaurant, a (presumably) unofficial Jurassic Park-themed Taiwanese restaurant in Industry, California. 

Weird shit used to be everywhere. If Tod Browning’s Freaks is to be believed, it used to be that you could barely open your door without tripping over some undiscovered weirdo. 

But then lunacy got gentrified and oddness became mainstream—co-opted by Phoebe from Friends and printed on trucker caps to be sold at Hot Topic (over 600 locations nationwide).

American entertainment became about gawking at weirdos. TV shows about women who eat couches or get plastic surgery to look like celebrities became the norm. The guy with a 300-pound scrotum (RIP) got an agent. 

Marketers and advertisers got their claws in, too. Weirdness used to be a pursuit for outsiders, but now it’s thought up by teams of market researchers, to be regurgitated by the Old Spice Guy or the Geico Gecko. 

Continue






guardian:

Five ways Mean Girls could have been a very different film

A decade after its release, the director has revealed some of the plot twists, casting shockers and zingers that never made it.














theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 
NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 
It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 
But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.
Read more.

[Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]

theatlantic:

This Is Big: Scientists Just Found Earth’s First-Cousin

Right now, 500 light years away from Earth, there’s a planet that looks a lot like our own. It is bathed in dim orangeish light, which at high noon is only as bright as the golden hour before sunset back home. 

NASA scientists are calling the planet Kepler-186f, and it’s unlike anything they’ve found. The big news: Kepler-186f is the closest relative to the Earth that researchers have discovered. 

It’s the first Earth-sized planet in the habitable zone of another star—the sweet spot between too-hot Mercury-like planets and too-cold Neptunes— and it is likely to give scientists their first real opportunity to seek life elsewhere in the universe. “It’s no longer in the realm of science fiction,” said Elisa Quintana, a researcher at the SETI Institute. 

But if there is indeed life on Kepler-186f, it may not look like what we have here. Given the redder wavelengths of light on the planet, vegetation there would sprout in hues of yellow and orange instead of green.

Read more.

[Image: NASA Ames/SETI Institute/JPL-Caltech]